*From:* Debra Saunders [mailto:xxx@reviewjournal.com]
*Sent:* Friday, February 2, 2018 12:41 PM
*Subject:* In-Town Pool #3 North Korean defectors

Below is information on the attendees of President Trump's meeting with North Korean defectors.

When the pool entered, the president was seated in a yellow chair. He was wearing a red tie. A translator sat between Trump and a defector.

Trump seemed very engaged and sympathetic. Will send quotes when I can.

DJS

Attendees for the North Korean defectors meeting:

1.KIM Kwang-jin

2.LEE Hyeonseo

3.JUNG Gwang-il

4.KIM Young-soon

5.JI Seong-ho

6.JUNG Peter Young

For you background from the attendees - -

*KIM Kwang-jin*

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In September 2003, Kim Kwang-jin and his family rushed to an airport in Southeast Asia to fly to freedom in Seoul, South Korea. Months earlier, Kim lived a privileged life working for the regimes overseas banking operations in Singapore. Then, Kim fell out of favor after he was suspected of leaking information about the regime to foreign nationals. Before being summoned back to North Korea to face severe punishment, Kim made the decision to defect with his family. During his banking career, Kim helped earn millions of dollars for what he calls North Koreas royal palace economy and other illegal operations that financially supported the totalitarian regime.

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Today, as non-resident fellow at the Committee for Human Rights in North Korea (HRNK), Kwang-jin Kim is an invaluable, experienced resource shedding light into the darkest corners of the North Korean regimes secret and illegal international financial operations. His revelations have saved insurance companies tens of millions of dollars and brought an end to an important method used by the North Korean regime.

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*LEE Hyeonseo*

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As a child, Hyeonseo Lee thought her country was the best on the planet. It was not until the devastating famine of the 1990s that she began to question what she had been taught. She escaped to China when she was 17, and began a life in hiding as an illegal alien. Her recent memoir,"The Girl With Seven Names (2015),describes her privileged childhood in North Korea, her life in China, her decision to eventually settle in South Korea, and her journey back to North Korea to rescue her mother and brother.

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Lee recently completed her undergraduate studies in English and Chinese at the Hankuk University of Foreign Studies in Seoul, and has been a participant in the Young Leaders Program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. She was featured on TED Talks with over 13 million views, testified in front of a special panel of the UN Security Council, and has shared her story and insight with important world leaders.

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*JUNG Gwang-il*

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Gwang-il Jung is a North Korean escapee and former political prisoner who founded No Chain for North Korea, an organization based in South Korea that smuggles information into North Korea. After serving in the military and trade sectors for most of his young life in North Korea, Jung was arrested for espionage by the North Korean State Security Department in 1998 and imprisoned at Yodok Political Prison Camp No. 15 in 2000. He was incarcerated for three years. Soon after his release, Jung escaped to South Korea and worked at Free the NK Gulag before establishing No Chain for North Korea in 2013.

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Jung has testified about the abuses in North Korea in front of the European Union and U.S. Congress, and was a key resource for the UN Commission of Inquiry's investigation into North Korea's human rights violations as well as several HRNK reports.

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*KIM Young-soon*

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Young-soon Kim is the author of I Was a Friend of Sung Hae Rim, a North Korean escapee, and a survivor of the infamous North Korean political prison camp, Yodok Political Prison Camp No. 15. Kim, along with her family members, was imprisoned for nine years after the authorities realized she knew of her friends affair with Kim Jong-il. Before her imprisonment, she was a celebrated young dancer who lived among the North Korean elite. Kim escaped North Korea in 2001 and entered South Korea in 2003. Kim is now in her early 80s.

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*JI Seong-ho*

Seong-ho Ji is a North Korean escapee who grew up during the countrys grueling famine in the 1990s. In order to survive, Ji would exchange stolen coal for food on the black market. While taking coal from a train car in 1996, a malnourished Ji lost consciousness and fell onto the tracks, losing his left hand and foot when a train ran over him. After a grueling amputation surgery, Ji was left to fend for himself. In 2006, he escaped to South Korea, where he is now a law student at Dongguk University. Ji is also the president of Now Action and Unity for Human Rights (NAUH), where he helps broadcast information into North Korea and facilitates the resettlement of defectors in South Korea. His most recent work with NAUH involved giving theatrical performances entitled Kotjebi(Street Children) in the U.S. to detail the abuses that street children in the markets of North Korea face.

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*JUNG Peter Young*

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Peter Young Jung was born in North Korea and became an electrician in 1991 after attending Supoong Electric College in North Pyongan Province, North Korea. In 2000, he escaped North Korea through China, where he lived for several years. Jung briefly spent time in Mongolia before arriving in South Korea and eventually working at the North Korean escapee-run newspaper, Daily NK, and then studying law at Yonsei University in Seoul. Upon graduation, he moved to the U.S. and is now a naturalized U.S. citizen.

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Jung is currently a Radio Free Asia broadcaster based in Washington, DC, where he writes exclusive news on North Korea and has interviewed many senior officials. Jung is an experienced journalist, fluent in Chinese and English, and shares his experiences, research, and analysis on North Korea with thousands of people through his columns, radio broadcasts, and presentations at U.S. colleges.

--

Debra J. Saunders

White House Correspondent

Las Vegas Review-Journal

529 14th Street NW Suite 994

Washington, DC 20045

202-xxx-xxxx

Cell 202-xxx-xxxx


Public Pool is an automated feed of White House press pool reports. For live updates, follow @WHPublicPool on Twitter.